our impact

indigenous family in Loreto, who is part of the minga project embracing each other

“Thanks to Minga, I know now who I am. I am a woman who is capable of doing many things for my community”.

– Marjorie Odicio
Promoter of Los Delfines Community,
San Juan Bautista district, Loreto

For almost 20 years, the projects made and supervised by Minga Peru have been evaluated by peruvian and international experts with important results:

There is a decrease in domestic violence:

A study conducted with the help of the University of Ohio's Communications Faculty found that “There is evidence that there has been a decrease in domestic violence in communities of the Maranon river as a result of Minga's comprehensive intervention over the region”. A listener (and also community promoter) shared her testimony as part of this study: “Bienvenida Salud cut off my husband’s arms. Ever since we started listening to the radio program together, he has stopped hitting me”.

The public discourse has changed:

Women, men and youth are more informed and have deepened their understanding and perspective over gender equity, sexual and reproductive health, domestic violence, conservation, human rights, and other social justice issues.

Behaviors have changed:

Young women and men are making different choices about having babies at a young age and instead are choosing to pursue their education. Men are supporting their wives to attend workshops and trainings, participating more actively in their children's raising and feeding. Likewise, women are creating their own projects for generating income.

There are new ways of masculinity:

Men are speaking out about what it means to be a man who supports his wife or partner. Authorities state that they are now supporting women’s rights. Men are actively supporting women to lead income-generating projects that benefit the entire community. Thanks to this, there has been a radical shift in how men and women relate to each other.

Engagement has changed:

Women are participating as leaders in public spaces (even as community and municipal leaders) where they had no voice before.

 Policies and practices are changing:

Authorities are implementing laws related to reporting and prosecuting domestic violence cases.

Minga's accomplishments

More than 1200 women promoters trained

from over 50 rural communities working to advance human rights and educate their communities. Each promoter shares information and skills with her own network of 15 to 25 additional women, men and youth.

 

Training for 160 teachers and youth

on human rights issues and how to integrate this information and activism into the classroom curriculum.

Training of more than 80 NGOs

in Minga’s intercultural communications model for social change, gender equity, and human rights in Peru, Latin America, and the Caribbean.

Support of our listeners' voices

by receiving more than 40,000 letters, whose testimonies and interviews are read on air, bringing credibility and sustainability to the messages.

1,700 radio broadcasts produced

on human rights issues, training over 100 youth and women radio correspondents. For example, Minga’s programs explore women’s access to justice, including how to report a domestic violence incident, and how women and men can navigate the complicated local justice system.

 

Established collaborative partnerships with four municipalities

and supported the largest number of women presenting community projects that are funded by municipalities.

Support to 120 women and families to lead income generating projects

that provide them security and autonomy, creating access to a sustainable and diversified work for women, and decreasing the high vulnerability of the most marginalized and impoverished populations in the Amazon.

 

Reached over 120,000 listeners every week

over 19 years, with critical information about human rights, disability rights, sexual and reproductive health, domestic violence prevention, and many other human rights themes.

Was selected as a grantee of the Lindblad-National Geographic Fund (LEX-NG Fund)

to carry out important conservation, education, and community development work.

Was chosen by Lindblad and National Geographic

to host educational and cultural sharing interactions between travelers and locals in villages along the river.

testimonies

picture of Emira Montes - Loreto Region program coordinator

“My life plan changed when I started my training at Minga. First because I started to be aware of myself, of what I wanted for my future. Now, five years after I started, I want to be a lawyer because I have seen the needs of many women and witnessed how these trained women from my community reported abuse and violence and were not listened to. They had very few opportunities because they were women from the riverside. Now I’m finishing school and I want to continue studying, I’m going to be a lawyer and defend the women from my community”.

- Emira Montes
Trainer and Community Promoter
Puerto Peru Community

“Before, I did not have anyone to teach me anything. I only stayed alive because air is free; if there was food to eat, I ate. I did not think about how to value myself or take care of myself, and I had never heard of self-esteem. But now the trainings have done a lot of good towards helping me and my family live better…I know that what I have learnt is for sharing with the other mothers of my community, and also men can listen when I give talks in my community.”

-  María Tamani
Community Promoter, Santa Cruz Community

“Men study but women mostly don’t study, they only stay were they are; they hardly finish primary school... as soon as they are 14 they have a child. Looking at what is going on with the training I will tell the riverside women to continue, to be brave and continue ahead so they won’t be left behind, and that we will soon see the fruits, in ourselves and in our daughters”.

- Lupe Zuta
Mother of a Community Promoter,
Puerto Perú Community – Marañón River

“When I first came to a workshop five years ago people from my community were shouting at me “where has a donkey been seen going to a workshop?” while I was embarking. I didn’t pay any attention, and I arrived for the first time to a workshop at Minga without knowing how to write or read. I knew I could not continue living like that, like an animal. Now, five years later, I train women from my community and other river basins, I have my fishery that provides me with economic resources and there is peace in my home. They have asked me to be the first women to be the mayor’s second in command for my community and I’m going to accept”.

- Adela Shapiama
Community Promoter,
Santa Cruz Community